Category Archives: Features

2016 Senior Spotlight: Carter Hennessy

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Parents’ Name: Kim and Bret Hennessy
Hometown: Dysart
Birthday: December 24, 1997
Favorite TV show: Parks and Rec
Favorite Movie: Jurassic Park
Favorite restaurant: Newman’s Cafe
Favorite class: Psychology
Hobbies/Activities: Sports, video games, music
What is your most embarrassing moment at Union High School? Tripping in the halls all the time
What is your favorite memory from high school? All the friends I made
My biggest pet peeve is: People that don’t listen
Who are the most influential people in your life? My family
What will you miss most about high school?The people
Where do you see yourself in 20 years? Hopefully in a successful career
What is the best thing about being a senior? Seniority
What are your post-high school plans? Attend a four year college and play football
Your best advice to underclassmen? Maximize effort

2016 Senior Spotlight: Kaila Brustkern

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Parents’ Name: Curt and Jennifer Brustkern
Hometown: La Porte City
Birthday: September 10, 1998
Favorite color: Blue
Favorite TV show: Pretty Little Liars
Favorite restaurant: House of Blues
Favorite class: Art and psychology
Hobbies/Activities: Watching Netflix
What is your most embarrassing moment at Union High School? Don’t have one
What is your favorite memory from high school? Leaving Homecoming and going to Taco Bell
Who are the most influential people in your life? My family and friends
What will you miss most about high school? Less responsibility
Where do you see yourself in 20 years? Working and traveling
What is the best thing about being a senior? Early outs and late-ins
What are your post-high school plans? College
Your best advice to underclassmen? Don’t procrastinate

Meditations – February 10, 2016

By Rev. Rose M. Blank   St. Paul United Methodist Church, La Porte City

“Have mercy on me, O God, according to your steadfast love; according to your abundant mercy blot out my transgressions… Create in me a clean heart, O God, and put a new and right spirit within me.” (Psalm 51: 1, 10)

Hear, O Lord, when I cry aloud, be gracious to me and answer me!… I believe that I shall see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Wait for the Lord; be strong, and let your heart take courage; wait for the Lord! ” (Psalm 27: 7, 13-14)

“O God, you are my God, I seek you, my soul thirsts for you; my flesh faints for you, as in a dry and weary land.” (Psalm 63:1)

These are some of the psalms for the Lenten season – prayers filled with images of God’s abundant mercy and abiding presence. These ancient words of prayer are as relevant in our day as when they were penned centuries ago. They are filled with the range of human emotion that remind us of our longing and yearning for God, of our need to be made clean and forgiven, of our need to give thanks to God for the precious gift of life itself. The psalmist so aptly describes the feelings of anger, frustration and emptiness that helps us to name what is in our own heart and soul. As a wise professor once told me, these prayers are what we need when we don’t know what to say to God. They are also what we need when we have many things to say to God.
This Lenten season is a time for listening to God and praying with the words of Scripture. So spend some time in The Psalms and let the richness of their words speak to your heart. Let them fill your life with reminders of God’s never-ending love and let the words of forgiveness wash your heart anew. All this is not only for our own well-being, but it shapes who we are and how we live in the world around us so that we might embody God’s grace and mercy in a world that yearns for Christ’s love.

2016 Senior Spotlight: Jacob Condon

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Parents’ Name: Lorie and Josh Condon
Hometown: Dysart
Birthday: October 2, 1997
Favorite color: Green
Favorite TV show: Dexter
Favorite Movie: Fast 7
Favorite restaurant: TJ’s
Favorite class: Lunch
Hobbies/Activities: Work
What is your most embarrassing moment at Union High School? September 28, 2014 at 3:30 PM
What is your favorite memory from high school? Construction class
My biggest pet peeve is: When I call someone and they text back “you called?”
Who is the most influential person in your life? Bruce J. Wigg
What will you miss most about high school? Free Wi-Fi
Where do you see yourself in 20 years? Being 38 years old
What is the best thing about being a senior? Having seniority
What are your post-high school plans? Working for Pipestone
Your best advice to underclassmen? Take as many classes with Wigg as possible!

Adventures at the Museum – February 10, 2016

By Jan Erdahl, Museum Director

Does this latest round of snow and cold leave you with a case of cabin fever? The museum has plenty of opportunities for anyone who is wanting to volunteer, whether for an hour, a day or on a regular basis. Work has begun on next year’s exhibits. It takes a great deal of time and effort to develop these exhibits. If you have some extra time and would like to volunteer at the Museum, we always have a spot available. Jobs range from research, to filing, dusting, arranging exhibits, or even raising a log cabin. No matter what the task, we always have fun! To volunteer, visit us on our website at www.lpcmuseum.com or call us at 319-342-3619.
One very visible example of our volunteer efforts last year has been the restoration of our 1861 log cabin. This cabin is a subsistence cabin, which was typically used while a site transitioned into a profit making farm. It was built by the George Peck family. Peck would be best described as a naturalist and taxidermist. While in his cabin on the Cedar River he collected nearly 500 specimens of flora and fauna, some of which were displayed at the Smithsonian. The cabin was donated to the museum by the Dick Keegan family. To save this important piece of history, the cabin was completely deconstructed piece by piece, moved to a cement pad and placed on a limestone foundation. While this may sound like an easy task, it was far from it. Each piece of wood from the log cabin was meticulously removed and numbered to insure that it was placed back in the original spot. When weather permits, the cabin will be rechinked and will hopefully stand for another 155 years as a symbol of the pioneer spirit of La Porte City and other small rural towns as they helped to build our nation. A new appreciation for the hardships endured by our original settlers was garnered by our group of “pioneers” who helped to restore the cabin: Dick Dewater, who served as project chair, Louis Beck and FFA students, Joseph Walleser and industrial tech students, Gary Sheffler, Steve Miller, Jerry Erdahl, Jim Steffan, Mike Craft and Dean Fehl. This cabin will be part of our Rural Iowa Heritage Center which will be dedicated at the Fall Festival in September.